Which is the best for weight loss? Diet vs Metabolic Boosting.

Which is the best for weight loss? Diet vs Metabolic Boosting.

When it comes to weight loss, there are generally three schools of thought. The first is extreme dieting. This involves strictly following the instructions of the latest dieting trend to make headlines. The measures are extreme, and the results are generally short-lived. The second is balanced dieting – controlling your calorie intake against the amount of calories you burn during the day. Creating a calorie deficit is said to result in weight loss. The third is metabolism boosting. Your metabolism is the process by which your body turns food into energy. A slow metabolism leads to your body storing food as fat, while a fast metabolism burns through food more quickly. So which approach is best?

1.) Extreme dieting is nonsense.

You might see short term results, but it is generally completely unsustainable. Put it out of your mind.

2.) Balanced dieting vs. working on your metabolism?

Proponents of both are often quick to disparage the benefits of the other. The reality is a balanced diet and boosting your metabolism really go hand in hand. Keeping both in mind is the best way to approach weight loss.

 

There are many ways to boost your metabolism, but the most important is to make sure you are eating enough of the right foods. Severely reducing your calorie intake slows down your metabolism, making weight loss even more difficult. In order to lose weight, you need to maintain your calorie intake. This is being aware of just how many calories you are taking it, and how you are getting them. By substituting fatty, high-calorie foods for greater portions of healthy, low-calorie foods, you will speed up your metabolism and lose weight more quickly.

Another aspect of dieting and metabolism is exercise. Aerobic exercise burns calories, but by increasing your heart rate you can encourage your metabolism to work faster, greatly increasing the benefits. A good way to increase heart rate is to introduce high-intensity periods to your exercise. Joggers can break out to a sprint and walkers can increase to a jog —30 seconds every few minutes.

The truth is there is no definitive answer to the question of dieting vs. metabolism. A balanced diet (not a severe calorie cutting diet) will naturally improve your metabolism. Similarly, foods and activities to boost your metabolism will result in a more balanced diet. The key is in understanding your body. Understand the foods it needs and what positively impacts your metabolism. Keeping both in mind can you see sustained, permanent weight loss.

What are the Reasons To Exercise After Age 50?

What are the Reasons To Exercise After Age 50?

For many, growing older seems to involve an inevitable loss of strength, energy and vigor—but that need not be, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Frailty and decreased energy associated with aging are largely due to muscle loss due to inactivity. And when it comes to muscle, the old saying is true: “Use it or lose it.”

What To Do: One of the best ways to keep muscles healthy and strong, the CDC advises, is through exercises called strength training.

Why Do It: Regular strength training builds bone, muscle and helps to preserve strength, independence and energy. These exercises are safe and effective for women and men of all ages, including those not in perfect health. In fact, people with health concerns, such as arthritis or heart disease, often benefit the most from lifting weights a few times each week. Strength training can also reduce the signs and symptoms of:

  • Arthritis—reduces pain and stiffness and increases strength and flexibility.
  • Diabetes—improves glycemic control.
  • Osteoporosis—builds bone density and reduces the risk for falls.
  • Heart disease—reduces cardiovascular risk by improving lipid profile and overall fitness.
  • Obesity—increases metabolism, which helps burn more calories and helps with long-term weight control.
  • Back pain—strengthens back and abdominal muscles to reduce stress on the spine.

What’s more, studies have shown that people who exercise regularly sleep better and have less depression, more self-confidence and self-esteem, and a greater sense of well-being. Fore more details please visit https://www.mdlaserandcosmetics.com/

Fortunately, strength training exercises are easy to learn and have been proven safe and effective through years of thorough research. What’s more, you may be relieved to learn, there are ways to train without undo strain, aches, and pains.

 

MD Wellness Advice

Advice:

  • A few minutes (2-3 times a week) to maintain general fitness. 3 or 4 five-minute bursts of activity such as walking or stair climbing.
  • 2-3 more minutes a day for yoga breathing and movements for body maintain balance, usable strength, flexibility, and muscular restoration.
  • Another few minutes every day and before any vigorous exercise doing calf stretches and forward bends.
  • Stay hydrated before, during and after your workout.
  • Reduce risk of muscle soreness after exercise; consider massage, Epsom salts bath or intermittent hot and cold showers, and proper stretching and cooldown.
  • Signs you should look for alerting you to rest your muscles and avoid overtraining are a higher than normal resting heart rate, disrupted sleep due to an elevated heart rate, muscle cramping, and muscle twitching. All signs of muscle strains and pulls.
  • Eat right. In addition to lots of fruits and vegetables and a few lean meats, consume foods with magnesium, which helps fight inflammation, and with vitamin B12—especially if you’re over 50—such as fortified cereals. Drink three cups of fat-free or low-fat milk throughout the day or consume the equivalent in yogurt, cheese or other dairy products. Consider an anti-inflammatory diet—cut out sugar, potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplant.
  • Topical pain relievers such as creams, gels, and patches work locally. Lidocaine is a highly effective pain reliever and its unique non-narcotic and nonaddictive properties make it a benign alternative to opioids, without the risks and devastating side effects of opioids.”
How Does Exercise Affect Metabolism?

How Does Exercise Affect Metabolism?

Your metabolism is like a woodstove. When you put a log on the fire, the fire gets hotter and produces more heat. Once that log is consumed, the fire dies down to just coals until you add another log. Overall when you exercise, your metabolism works harder to provide more energy to your muscles. But the type of exercise you do makes a difference as to how hard your metabolism works.

Before we get into the specifics as far as the types of exercise that make your metabolism work the hardest, let’s first talk about the three types of calorie-burning processes:

1) Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR):

This is the rate your metabolism works while sitting, sleeping, standing, etc. It accounts for about 75% of the time your metabolism is working and for the most part, is a fairly constant rate until you eat or exercise.

2) Thermal Effect of Food (TEF):

Once you have something to eat, your metabolism kicks into TEF mode to digest and process the food just consumed. This accounts for about 10% of the time during your day. Eating six small meals per day, keeps the TEF going at a steadier rate than does three meals per day, which causes a more cyclic up-and-down rate; because you always have some food in your stomach, your metabolism stays in TEF longer.

3) Physical Activity Energy Expenditure (PAEE):

Once you start exercising, you are burning more energy than with the other two methods, so your body has to work harder to keep up with the increased energy requirement. Washing dishes, walking up stairs, doing laundry, etc. all qualify as exercise, as does a workout, and thus will kick your metabolism into PAEE mode.

 

What Type of Exercise Will Make A Difference?

While exercising, in general, does affect the PAEE of your metabolism, different types of exercise affect it more than others. For instance, it is easy to accept you burn more calories running for 20 minutes than you do walking for the same amount of time. Both use the same large lower muscle groups but at different rates.

However, there is a big difference in your PAEE between cardio and strength training. There is even a difference between the types of cardio. Low intensity and endurance training focus more on burning fat instead of glucose stored in the muscles. For more details please visit https://www.mdlaserandcosmetics.com/

But high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and weight lifting, the focus is on burning glucose stored in the muscles. That glucose has to get replaced so your PAEE stays up higher and longer even after finishing your workout. And of course, the more muscle you build, the more calories you burn, even at the RMR rate.