March brings with it the promise of warm and sunny days because it is the vernal equinox. Earth spins a winter frostbitten cheek toward springtime when animals are waking up from their long winter sleep to come out of hibernation and flowers poke their heads out of a defrosting earth to greet the sun.

The American poet George Washington Wright Houghton writes “In come the March winds, they blow and blow, they sweep up the brown leaves, that green ones may grow”, captivating our imagination and excitement as we look forward to spring.

March enters with bluster after the hectic rush of the New Year. But, before we enter the mid-year slump, now is a great time to re-evaluate goals, re-write our to-do lists to see if we are still on track to have your best year yet.

So before begin spring cleaning or playing outside in the beautiful weather, take a moment to read this issue. I think you’ll find it informative and helpful. So without further ado, let’s begin!

Myths, false information and folklore have created confusion about things that affect decisions in our daily lives. One thing that is true, however, is that fruits and vegetables are healthful foods.
Here are the top five myths about fruits and vegetables and the facts that can help you stay healthy.

Myth 1: Fresh is best.

Fact: Unless you eat them, you don’t get the benefits of fruits and vegetables, so try what fits best into your lifestyle: fresh, frozen, canned, dried or 100 percent juice. If you’re going to cook them anyway or want them fast, think of canned and frozen.

Myth 2: Organic is more nutritious.

Fact: Organic fruits and vegetables have not been proven to be more nutritious than traditionally harvested fruits and vegetables.

Myth 3: Potatoes and other starchy vegetables are fattening.

Fact: A plain medium potato, with no fattening toppings, may actually aide in weight loss and maintenance. Potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of fiber and are one of the largest sources of potassium, per serving, of all fruits and vegetables.

Myth 4: Dietary supplements are necessary for health.

Fact: Fruits and vegetables have hundreds of active compounds with a long list of health benefits, which haven’t been able to be replicated with supplements. Antioxidants in fruits and vegetables are most beneficial when acquired through whole food ­consumption.

Myth 5: Fruits and vegetables are expensive.

Fact: Fruits and vegetables can be included in a healthy diet, even on a budget. According to the USDA, most adults can meet the fruit and vegetable recommendation for less than $2.50 per day.
Most Americans do not consume enough fruits and vegetables to meet recommendations in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Many consumers perceive these foods to be expensive. The United States Department of Agriculture estimates the average price at retail stores of a pound and an edible cup-equivalent (or for juices, a pint and an edible cup-equivalent) of 156 commonly consumed fresh and processed fruits and vegetables and find that in 2013, a consumer on a 2,000-calorie diet could satisfy Federal fruit and vegetable recommendations for $2.10 to $2.60 per day.
The USDA also finds that a family of four could purchase a sufficient variety of fruits and vegetables to meet those same guidelines with a limited budget, based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Thrifty Food Plan (TFP). However, this would require the household to allocate a much larger share of its overall food budget to fruits and vegetables and a smaller share to foods high in solid fats, added sugars, and sodium. For more details please visit MD Laser and Cosmetics website.