I Am Considering Aesthetic Treatment, What Should I Know?

I Am Considering Aesthetic Treatment, What Should I Know?

If you ever considered an aesthetic treatment like Botox® or laser hair removal, but were nervous because you didn’t know what to expect? A great way to enjoy cosmetic treatments and build your confidence is to go with a friend. Just like shopping, working out or dieting, it’s always better with a buddy.

Men and women are increasingly turning to non-invasive services to help them look and feel their best. According to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, over 1.5 million laser facial procedures and about half a million laser hair removal treatments are performed per year. Still, going by yourself could seem daunting.

Chemical peels can be used in conjunction with other facial procedures such as Botox® and Restylane® (the combination of treatments used depends on what is needed to give you the new look you desire). When administered correctly, they will smooth the surface of your skin, improve your skin tone and color, diminish wrinkles and shrink blood vessels and pore size.

Restylane®, does more than smooth skin. Studies show it stretches fibroblases (the cells in the skin that make collagen) in a way that produces new collagen. This treatment may last longer than many other skin-smoothing products.

The laser/IPL hair removal process involves sending a gentle beam of laser energy through the skin to the hair follicle, where the energy is absorbed by the hair and transformed into heat. This process destroys the hair follicle, preventing new hair from growing.

 

MD Wellness Aesthetic expert

An Expert Opinion

According to an article in The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology non-invasive skin rejuvenation and laser hair removal are perhaps the two most popular laser procedures. In fact, an intense pulsed light (IPL) laser can treat both superficial vascular and melanocytic lesions, generate collagen stimulation, and affect hair removal.

 

Personal Advice

Whether it involves skin rejuvenation (like skin tightening and photofacial), body shaping (like fat melting and cellulite reduction) or laser hair removal treatments, having someone to schedule appointments with and brag about results to, makes the journey more enjoyable and eventful.

You can give someone you care about the gift of being happy with what she sees whenever she looks in the mirror.

How Does Exercise Affect Metabolism?

How Does Exercise Affect Metabolism?

Your metabolism is like a woodstove. When you put a log on the fire, the fire gets hotter and produces more heat. Once that log is consumed, the fire dies down to just coals until you add another log. Overall when you exercise, your metabolism works harder to provide more energy to your muscles. But the type of exercise you do makes a difference as to how hard your metabolism works.

Before we get into the specifics as far as the types of exercise that make your metabolism work the hardest, let’s first talk about the three types of calorie-burning processes:

1) Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR):

This is the rate your metabolism works while sitting, sleeping, standing, etc. It accounts for about 75% of the time your metabolism is working and for the most part, is a fairly constant rate until you eat or exercise.

2) Thermal Effect of Food (TEF):

Once you have something to eat, your metabolism kicks into TEF mode to digest and process the food just consumed. This accounts for about 10% of the time during your day. Eating six small meals per day, keeps the TEF going at a steadier rate than does three meals per day, which causes a more cyclic up-and-down rate; because you always have some food in your stomach, your metabolism stays in TEF longer.

3) Physical Activity Energy Expenditure (PAEE):

Once you start exercising, you are burning more energy than with the other two methods, so your body has to work harder to keep up with the increased energy requirement. Washing dishes, walking up stairs, doing laundry, etc. all qualify as exercise, as does a workout, and thus will kick your metabolism into PAEE mode.

 

What Type of Exercise Will Make A Difference?

While exercising, in general, does affect the PAEE of your metabolism, different types of exercise affect it more than others. For instance, it is easy to accept you burn more calories running for 20 minutes than you do walking for the same amount of time. Both use the same large lower muscle groups but at different rates.

However, there is a big difference in your PAEE between cardio and strength training. There is even a difference between the types of cardio. Low intensity and endurance training focus more on burning fat instead of glucose stored in the muscles.

But high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and weight lifting, the focus is on burning glucose stored in the muscles. That glucose has to get replaced so your PAEE stays up higher and longer even after finishing your workout. And of course, the more muscle you build, the more calories you burn, even at the RMR rate.